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Technical Forum
Featured Paper
  • Wednesday, March 16, 2016
    AJ Cowieson et al., DSM
    Exogenous phytases have been used commerc¡ally s¡nce the early 1990s as a successful tool for reduc¡ng the env¡ronmental ¡mpact of ¡ndustr¡al livestock product¡on and ¡mprov¡ng poultry and sw¡ne prof¡tability (Selle & Rav¡ndran, 2007). These cost-sav¡ng and susta¡nability benef¡ts der¡ve pr¡mar¡ly from phytase's ability to l¡berate phosphorus from phytate. The breakdown of th¡s poorly d¡gest¡ble compound ¡mproves an¡mals' phytate-phosphorus retent¡on and reduces the need to use ¡norgan¡c phosphorus sources ¡n the d¡et. However, the hydrolysis of phytate also delivers several additional physiological effects in animals, which extend beyond phosphorus alone. These additional benefits include the retention of amino acids, trace minerals, calcium and energy. Phytase also offers performance enhancements which extend beyond expectations associated simply with nutrient release values (Cowieson et al., 2011). The exact cause of these enhanced benefits, however, is currently not fully understood. New research condncted by DSM has revealed important new insights into the 'extra-phosphoric' effects of phytase, particularly on the role of myo-inositol.
Wednesday, March 16, 2016
Dr. Casey Bradley, AB Vista Swine Technical Manager
  • Traditionally, the inclusion of a xylanase has been most popular in swine diets containing higher levels of wheat or barley, where the ability to increase nutrient digestibility has produced reliable improvements in pig performance. However, an historic lack of consistency within the published research relating to xylanase utilisation in corn-based diets has led to a lack of confidence among many of those feeding corn as the main cereal grain.
Wednesday, March 16, 2016
Dr. Ajay Bhoyar - Senior Manager, Global Poultry Marketing, Novus International, Inc.; Dr. Drew Lichtenstein - Manager, Enzymes and Specialty Products Development, Novus International, Inc.
  • The upward trend in commercial animal feed conditioning temperatures aimed at improving pellet quality, as well as enhancing feed hygiene, continually tests the stability limits of various feed additives. Enzymes, in particular, are susceptible to potential heat-mediated loss of catalytic activity. As a result, the feed industry continues to explore opportunities for retaining the desired level of enzyme activity in the face of ever harsher feed manufacturing conditions.
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