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Technical Forum
Featured Paper
  • Friday, May 12, 2017
    Sean Francey and Ericka Mongeau, VAL-CO
    Biosecurity is the prevention and control of pathogenic microorganisms from contacting animal or human populations. In the context of modern poultry production, it is essentially keeping the birds separate from the agents causing the disease. Used properly, biosecurity will also minimize the effect of disease and contain the spread of disease, if found. As such, biosecurity is first and foremost a management-based approach. Initial design of biosecurity policies and procedures should incorporate input from veterinarians, state agencies, and national guidelines. An understanding of the major diseases present today will aid the producer in crafting and understanding the biosecurity policy.
Friday, May 05, 2017
Dr. Inge van Roovert-Reijrink; Carla van der Pol M.Sc.
  • Besides optimizing hatchability, an important aim of a hatchery is to deliver perfect day-old chickens. Chick quality is expressed in many ways, most important of which are number of second grades, hatchling yolk free body mass, chick length, navel quality, and first week growth and mortality. During the incubation process, eggshell temperature, carbon dioxide concentration, and post hatch environment are the most important drivers of embryo development and, therefore, chick quality and subsequent performance. In the current article, all of these factors are discussed as well as how they depend on incubator design.
  • The EU ban on conventional barren cages for laying hens from 2012 has improved many aspects of laying hen welfare. The new housing systems allow for the expression of highly-motivated behaviors. However, the systems available for intensive large-scale egg production (e.g., aviaries, floor housing systems, furnished cages) may cause other welfare challenges. We have reviewed the literature regarding the health, behavior, production characteristics, and welfare of laying hens when exposed to ammonia in their housing environment.
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