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Livestock Production
Monday, December 11, 2006 1:41:47 PM
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Culture techniques of Moina

 
R.W. Rottmann, J. Scott G raves, Craig Watson and Roy P.E. Yanong

 


Daphnia are small freshwater cladoceran crustaceans commonly called "water fleas."This common name is the result not only of their size, but their short, jerky hopping movement in water. T The genera Daphnia and Moina are closely related. They occur throughout the world and are collectively known as daphnia
 

Newly-hatched fry of most freshwater fish species can ingest young Moina as their initial food. However, it should be noted that it can be difficult to grade Moina for size. It was found through trials at the UF/IFAS Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory that passing Moina through 500 micron mesh screening tends to fragment the animals to such an extent that they are no longer usable as live food.

 

In aquaria, care must also be taken when determining feeding rates, as Moina can quickly grow too large to be eaten. If these larger Moina become too dense, their "hopping" movements can serve to harass and potentially damage fry.

 

The nutritional content of Moina varies considerably depending on their age and the type of food they are receiving. Although variable, the protein content of Moina usually averages 50% of the dry weight. Adults normally have a higher fat content than juveniles. The total amount of fat per dry weight is 20-27% for adult females and 4-6% for juveniles.

 

The article further lists procedures for Moina culture, the water, aeration and feeding required and inoculation. The last section also provides harvesting methods and sources.

 
 

For more of the article, please click here

 

Article made possible through the contribution of the University of Florida-extension

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