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Functional Additives
Thursday, October 23, 2008 4:30:18 PM
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Common soybean diseases
 
Phillip W. Pratt
 
 

The major diseases of soy in Oklahoma are caused by fungi, bacteria, and nematodes that attack seed, seedlings, roots, foliage, pods, and stems. Conditions favourable for disease development can result in stand loss, reduction in seed quality, and occasionally yield losses. Severity of disease develop­ment and need for control are influenced by varietal selection and environmental conditions. Correct identification and early detection are critical in the proper management of soy diseases.

 

Seedling diseases are caused by a group of fungi, acting independently or together, that cause similar symptoms on young plants. These diseases are classified as being either pre-emergence or post-emergence. Seedlings that become diseased prior to emerging through the soil surface are de­scribed as having pre-emergence seedling disease.

 

A basic strategy for control of soy diseases is pre­vention. The following suggestions are offered in an attempt to provide soy producers some basic components that will aid in the prevention of soy diseases.

  • Plant high quality, preferably certified seed.
     
  • Apply fungicide seed treatment.
     
  • Use proper seed bed preparation, planting depth, and seeding rates.
     
  • Practice crop rotation with non-legume crops.
     
  • Use deep plowing to bury plant debris.
     
  • Plant disease and nematode resistant varieties.
     
  • Apply foliar fungicides to maintain seed quality.
     
  • Practice good management of fertility, weeds, and in­sects
 
For more of the article, please click here

 

Article made possible through the contribution of Oklahoma State University.

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