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Livestock Production
Thursday, October 23, 2008 4:58:45 PM
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Feeding wheat to hogs
 
William G. Luce
 

Wheat has been fed to hogs in varying amounts for many years. Interest in wheat as a swine feed depends largely on the price relationship between wheat and other cereal grains. There have been periods in recent years when wheat has been competitively priced with other cereal grains, justifying its use in swine diets. When wheat is competitively priced with other cereal grains, it becomes especially attractive to Oklahoma pork producers since Oklahoma is a major wheat producing state. Wheat production in the state ranges from 100 to 200 million bushels annually. Often the state's wheat harvest is five times as great as the combined production of sorghum grain, barley, corn and oats. Feeding wheat to hogs is viewed as a grain marketing alternative by some wheat producers who also raise hogs.

 

When wheat replaces another cereal grain such as corn or sorghum grain for swine, consideration must be given to nutrient content of wheat as compared to the other grains.

 

Wheat is equal in energy to sorghum grain but slightly lower than corn. Wheat is also normally higher in crude pro­tein and essential amino acids than corn or sorghum grain. Calcium and phosphorus content of wheat is also higher than usually found in corn or sorghum grain and recent data sug­gests that phosphorus availability in wheat is slightly higher. The higher lysine and phosphorus level in wheat makes it necessary to feed a supplement that is especially designed for feeding with wheat if producers wish to take advantage of the higher lysine and phosphorus in wheat.

 

Wheat can be used successfully in swine diets. It is equal in energy to sorghum grain but slightly lower than corn. It is normally higher in crude protein and essential amino acids than corn or sorghum grain.

 
 

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Article made possible through the contribution of Oklahoma State University.

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