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Functional Additives
Friday, October 11, 2013 7:02:15 PM
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Improving protein digestibility one step further - Role of Multi-Proteases
 

Chinnadurai Sugumar, Bindhu L.V and Monika Bieber

 
 

In recent years there have been intensive efforts to improve the nutritive value of feedstuffs using dietary exogenous enzymes.  Multi-enzyme preparations are used for the effective hydrolysis of a variety of indigestible components of feeds. The application of an effective blend of enzymes should further improve the competitiveness of alternative feed materials such as rice bran, cassava and DDGS, with other conventional sources of protein and energy such as soybean meal and corn, by improving the nutrient utilization and reducing the need for amino acids. Dietary enzymes can be used to supplement the pig's own enzyme production, including amylases to improve starch digestibility1, proteases to improve protein digestibility2, and NSP enzymes to target non-digestible non starch polysaccharides (NSP) constituents within the feed.

 

Improving the efficiency of feed utilization is important because feed accounts for the largest cost in pig production. Protein sources are the most costly ingredients in swine feed. However, a fraction of the proteins in most swine diets cannot be fully broken down, digested and absorbed by the animal. Many commercial feed enzymes use "neutral protease" enzyme for the improvement of protein utilization in animal diets. In a study carried out at Kemin Animal Nutrition and Health, Singapore, demonstrated that combined application of acidic, neutral and alkaline proteases releases more amino acids in vitro and significantly improve the bioavailability of nitrogen in vivo.
 

 

For more of the article, please click here.

 

Article made possible through the contribution of Kemin Industries, Inc.

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