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Livestock Production
Thursday, August 31, 2006 3:06:21 PM
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Common poultry diseases

 
Stanley L. Vanhooser
 

 

Disease control and prevention is essential in order to maintain a healthy, productive flock, particularly in a small farm.

 

This fact sheet discusses diseases diagnosed in poultry from small farm flocks.

 

The first section covers bacterial infections such as infectious Coryza, fowl cholera, avian mycoplasmosis and mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG).

 

Diseases can spread quickly in the enclosed space of poultry farms, however there are those that spread slowly as well, causing what are seemingly unexplained deaths.

 

The article helpfully explains likely reasons for how the above diseases might be introduced and its different forms.

 

It individually lists modes of transmissions, mortality rates, clinical signs and treatment of these common diseases as well as prevention measures that would help reduce future incidences of the disease.

 

The article also covers the bacteria names of each disease and whether vaccination is recommended in each case. Some of the diseases affect particular species of chickens or chickens of particular ages more seriously and these are documented accordingly.

 

The viral diseases covered include fowl pox, a slow-spreading infectious viral disease of poultry, Marek's Disease, a viral-induced-neoplastic disease of chickens, Infectious Bronchitis, a highly contagious viral respiratory disease of chickens caused by a coronavirus and Newcastle Disease, an acute contagious viral respiratory disease of all birds caused by a paramyxovirus.

 

Again, the article covers the modes of transmissions, mortality, clinical signs and treatment of these common diseases. In the last, it also suggests the sort of antibiotics to treat these diseases.

 
 

For more of the article, please click here  

 

Article made possible through the contribution of the Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service.  

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