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Livestock Production
Tuesday, August 01, 2006 6:03:21 PM
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Broiler production: Considerations for potential growers

 
Damona Doye

 


Commercial broiler production tends to be concentrated in a relatively small radius around an integrator's feed mill and other facilities. Because the costs of building a hatchery, feed mill, and processing facilities can run into several million dollars, integrators will not likely build facilities in new areas unless a dramatic growth in demand for their product is expected.


If integrators choose to expand, the profitability of both the grower and the integrator favors established growing areas.


The poultry company will, if possible, operate multiple shifts and maximize use of their existing plant capacity. Since the integrator's facilities tend to be centrally located, an expansion of the grower territory means higher transportation costs for the delivery of chicks and feed and for hauling broilers from the grower to the processing facilities.


The article also covers useful tips on financing and lists out the requirements a potential grower would need before making out a loan. The article emphasizes a close relationship with integrators and yet cautions growers that they must be prepared in the event that such intergrators reduce batches.


It lists out the kind of buildings required, its orientation, size and accessibility. The article once again how the integrator comes into the picture, highlighting the fact that it tries to make everything uniform so as to save costs. It goes on to a list of equipment required in such a farm.


The fact sheet also describes the necessary farm chores required. Some tips on waster management are also provided, such as regulations to look out for and the limit of waste that a farm can produce.


Running a poultry farm would also require education, registration and certification, the article teaches you how to breeze through it all.


The article also assesses the profitability and costs of such an operation, taking into account factors like mortality rates.

 

 

For more of the article, please click here

 

Article made possible through the contribution of the Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service.

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