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Livestock Production
Friday, June 13, 2008 4:13:50 PM
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Caring for livestock during disaster

 
S. Cotton, R. Ackerman

 

Many people in the US are moving back to rural communities. For many reasons, these new rural residents often desire a lifestyle that includes owning horses, cattle, goats, chickens, ducks, sheep, llamas, alpacas and others. As people move closer to their natural resources, they also move farther from the protection offered by urban and suburban infrastructure.

 

In most cases, the response time and resources in rural areas are greatly reduced. Handling disasters, those catastrophic events which stretch the capacity of communities, can only be approached with preparedness, pre-planned reaction and post-event mitigation. During a disaster event, rural residents often find their personal safety a large enough challenge without the added burden of caring for livestock.

 

Normally, the response time for disaster is extremely limited. If you are not aware of pre-existing conditions, you will have even less time to respond. It's important to mentally develop a priority system for safety efforts. There are differences in the speed, characteristics, risks and response protocols for different types of disasters. Identify which disasters have a better chance of happening in your area and address those risks first.

 

Disasters within the article's discussion include flash floods; large floods; tornadoes; hurricanes; blizzards; wildfires; avalanches and drought.

 
 

For more of the article, please click here

 

Article made possible through the contribution of Colorado State University Extension.

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