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Functional Additives
Thursday, May 24, 2007 2:57:52 PM
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Natural health improvement for livestock with PSB-Complex
 
Klaus Hoffmann

 

 

Since January 2006, the European Union has prohibited the use of antimicrobial growth promoters (AGPs) in the livestock industry. This strictly limits antibiotic usage to veterinarian indications and bans the use of drugs with growth promoting properties.

 

Consumer demand for high-quality and healthy products puts livestock producers in a predicament. Although the genetic potential of various livestock breeds is known, it is usually not reached under normal farming conditions as too many factors negatively affect animal performance. Besides for instance, the improvement of management and housing, using feed alternatives in health management is a new target for farmers to maintain the efficiency of their livestock.

 

The objective of this article is to introduce the natural performance enhancer called PSB-Complex to avoid losses in productivity and income of producers under these circumstances.

 

PSB-Complex is a natural biologically active feed additive. It is a balanced formulation of purified RNA and purified nucleotides. Its balance of the basic components for rapid cell multiplication makes PSB-Complex an innovative and unique feed additive supporting the general health of animals by facilitating the immune response in case of a disease outbreak, and disengaging internal resources for livestock growth and development.

 

Additionally, the utilisation of any existing feed is augmented by active support of the intestinal progression and efficiency.

 

Feeds are usually well balanced in terms of energy, protein content, and yield of microelements as well as vitamins. Today's feeds are produced according to high standards to the best of producers' knowledge. But to utilise the genetic potential of livestock, an important feed component, nucleotides, was ignored in the past.

 

Some essential cells or tissues in the organism cannot produce enough nucleotides or lack the potential to produce them. Among these are cells of the intestinal tract, cells of the immune system and blood cells. Supplementation of PSB-Complex not only increases feed quality, but also supports vital functions of the organism.

 

Addition of PSB-Complex to feed has a significantly positive impact on cellular systems or tissues with low or no capability to produce nucleotides. The intestinal flora and intestinal tract of young animals are developed more rapidly with PSB-Complex. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium proliferate more easily leading to an ideal composition and development of the microflora.

 

Newborn animals are not provided with a functional immune system. Maternal antibodies present in colostrum and milk provide defence against microbial challenges in mammals. Their concentration decreases over time thereby forcing internal immunity to undertake this task. Unfortunately, as soon as maternal antibodies are too little, the internal immune response is not yet fully settled leading to poor defence.

 

PSB-Complex increases concentration of maternal antibodies and positively supports the setup of the internal immune system in piglets. In poultry or other non-mammalian species, PSB-Complex supports the activity of cellular immunity by providing raw materials for rapid proliferation of macrophages, natural killer cells and lymphocytes.

 

Mycotoxins cause staggering economic losses due to their negative effects on livestock through stress on animals on a cellular and molecular level. PSB-Complex supplies the basic molecules for cellular and molecular repair mechanisms, facilitating and accelerating tissue regeneration.

 
 

For more of the article, please click here.

 

Article made possible through the contribution of Chemoforma.

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