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Animal Health
Thursday, May 8, 2014 11:07:25 AM
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The mycotoxins challenge and seeking animal health
 

Alvaro Ortiz, product manager at Norel

 
 

There is a growing interest in mycotoxin detoxifying products based on the adsorption mechanism. The objective of this kind of products is to block the mycotoxins in the intestine, limiting their availability and consequently their metabolic effects. So the toxins must form a stable union with the product and remain so until they are excreted.

 

Aluminosilicates are a group of clays that present this adsorption capacity. Diatomaceous earths are another group of compounds found to have a great capacity for binding mycotoxins.

 

A study was conducted by the biological science faculty of the microbiology department of Complutense University of Madrid. A commercial product, TOXINOR®, which is based on two aluminosilicates and diatomaceous earth active compounds, was tested against the main mycotoxins affecting animal production: zearalenone (ZEN), aflatoxin b1 (AFB1), aflatoxin b2 (AFB2), aflatoxin g1, aflatoxin g2, aflatoxin m1, ochratoxin, deoxynivalenol, t-2 toxin (T-2) and y fumonisine b1.

 

Samples with specific additions of the purified mycotoxins (2 ppm) were treated with a dose of 0.5% of TOXINOR and subsequently the levels of the mycotoxins were measured by HPLC. The experiment was repeated at two different pH levels in order to detect any interaction between the mycotoxins.

 

Designed using three different ingredients that combines laminar 3D, fibrous-like and empty spheres structures, the product has a specific surface value maximised to cover the pH ranges of the mycotoxins, and optimised to act against the range of mycotoxins.
 

The product also showed a high binding capability for AFB1, AFB2, T-2, ZEN, fumonisine and ochratoxin.

 

In conclusion, a rational combination of mineral active matters can be used as an effective tool to reduce the contamination produced by the non-desired growth of fungi in both raw materials and feeds.

 

For more of the article, please click here.

 

Article made possible through the contribution of Alvaro Ortiz and Norel.

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