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Nutritional Additives
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 7:32:27 PM
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The high cost of protein ingredients in dairy rations - alternatives to balance amino acids
 

Ken Greaney, ruminant technical services manager, Kemin Animal Nutrition and Health, Asia Pacific, Singapore

   
     

Typically, when it comes to providing a specific intestinally available amino acid, rumen- protected amino acids are more cost effective compared to commodity-based feedstuffs, in addition to allowing nutritionists greater flexibility in ration formulation. 

 

The rumen-protected sources of lysine and methionine are considerably less expensive than most commodities when compared on the basis of dollar per gram of amino acid supplied. Further, the synthetically produced rumen-protected amino acids offer consistency of amino acid supplied to the small intestine (rumen bypass and small intestine availability) with little to no batch variation, hence removing the need to evaluate the amino acid concentration of each new batch of commodity supplied prior to adding it into the ration formulation.

 

For example, the commercial products LysiPEARL™ and MetiPEARL™ respectively contain encapsulated lysine and methionine, embedded in a matrix of hydrogenated palm oil, using the MicroPEARL™ brand spray freezing process. The product is free flowing, yet resistant to the physical damage associated with ration processing, such as mixing and pelleting, whilst maintaining rumen bypass and intestinal amino acid release. 

 

LysiPEARL™ has a rumen bypass of 55% and small intestine release rate of 95%, to provide 205 grams MP-Lysine per kg product.  MetiPEARL™ has a rumen bypass of 66% and small intestine release rate of 90%, to provide 326 grams MP-Methionine per kg product.  Both products are cost effective sources of rumen-protected amino acids.

 

Ultimately, it is important to review available feed options and select protein supplements from the ingredients available at the best price, to deliver the nutrients successfully under the conditions of one's operation, and to provide the amino acids to the cattle so she can milk to her genetic potential.

 

 

For more of the article, please click here.

 

Article made possible through the contribution of Ken Greaney and Kemin Asia Pacific.

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