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Livestock Production
Wednesday, January 23, 2008 2:53:54 PM
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General nutrition principles for swine

 
Kansas State University

 

 

Efficient and profitable swine production depends upon an understanding of the concepts of genetics, environment, herd health, management, and nutrition.

 

Feed represents 60 to 75 percent of the total cost of pork production. Therefore, amino acids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and water must be provided and bal­anced to meet the pig's requirements. Thus, a thorough knowledge of the principles of swine nutrition is essential in order to maintain a profit­able swine enterprise.

 

Improvements in production have led to changes in nutrient recommendations in order to maximize performance. These requirements are continuously changing and this publication has been divided into four sections so it can be revised periodically to keep up with the latest develop­ments and changes in technology. Furthermore, research summaries and additional information may be found by accessing our internet site at www.ksuswine.org. The purposes of these publi­cations is to provide the recommended nutrient allowances and answer some of the more frequent­ly asked questions concerning swine nutrition. In some instances it is advisable to seek professional advice for additional information.

 

The article discusses the various types of feeding strategies, common mistakes to avoid in a nutritional programme and how to calculate the economics of a pig feeding operation. It also discusses the various types of pig feed (including animal fats and vegetable oils) as well as issues of feed efficiency.

 
 

For more of the article, please click here.

 

Article made possible through the contribution of Kansas State University.

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